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Tracee Ellis Ross’ Space Buns Are Actually The Perfect Workout Hairstyle

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If you've ever been working out and with every push up your hair flops in your face, or by the end, it's completely stuck to your sweat (yeah, been there), Tracee Ellis Ross' space buns are your solution. Along with keeping your hair up and out of the way, the double bun style is super cute and easy to do.

Although the world is in the middle of a pandemic, and for some just hearing the word "workout" induces exhaustion, any avid follower of Ross knows she's dedicated to her Tracy Anderson Method no matter what. Which is why Ross' IGTV of herself doing a session in her own home due to social distancing on April 20 came as no surprise.

The Black-ish actor set up shop in her idyllic living room: large windows, a couch big enough to fit 10 people, and a fluffy black rug worthy of being swapped for your comforter. And, yes, her Carbon38 matching sky-blue ensemble may have been the first thing to grab your attention, but her space buns were surely next. The '90s hit hairstyle has had a resurgence lately (see: J.Lo's take on the Zenon-esque look), but Ross proves the buns can not only be stylish but functional, too.

As the actor moves around her yoga mat, lifting her legs, and even balancing head first off her chair, the space buns remain firmly in place. That means as you jump, the buns won't bounce and come undone, and as you change positions no strands will fall into your face. By wrapping the buns at the crown of the head, workouts that require you to lay on the floor are that much easier, too (aka there's nothing stopping your head from lying flat).

While Ross' version of the buns is simply dividing the hair and securing, you can also get creative with the look: Add braids, ribbon, or anything else that sparks a little joy. Finding *any* motivation to workout at home may be hard right now, but donning a new hairstyle that channels your inner Spice Girl might help.

If you think you’re showing symptoms of coronavirus, which include fever, shortness of breath, and cough, call your doctor before going to get tested. If you’re anxious about the virus’s spread in your community, visit the CDC for up-to-date information and resources, or seek out mental health support.