5 Foolproof Ways To Make A Tiny Room Look Bigger

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If you live in a small space (like, say, a teeny apartment in a metropolitan city), then you know that it’s incredibly easy to feel cramped, restricted and just generally smushed by your square footage. The struggle is real. So we caught up with interior designer Vanessa Alexander of Alexander Design to get her top tips for making a small space look and feel bigger.

Tessa Neaustadt

Size Doesn't Matter

"Indoor plants and trees add a natural element and bring life into the space for an instant open feel. Vertical ones like fiddle-leaf figs and banana leaves make ceilings seem taller, drawing your attention upward. Additionally, it is a great way to add color for people who prefer a neutral palette."

Tessa Neaustadt

"Low-profile furnishings make your space seem larger in contrast to the space, and the modern pieces create an easy and relaxed atmosphere. The unobstructed view to other areas keep the floor plan open and airy."

Crawley

"Keeping your color palette and materials very edited help you avoid having one piece overpower the room. Focus on textures and accent pieces for contrast and include focused vignettes to organize your furnishings and floor plan."

Tessa Neaustadt

"Reflective surfaces like mirrors diffuse natural light, carrying it through the entire room. They can also be statements themselves and play tricks on the eye, offering new perspectives of a room. Mirrors are the most obvious choice, and I love incorporating oversize ones in dining rooms; however, even carefully placed polished appliances and reflective furniture can have the same effect spreading light throughout."

Crawley

"Continuous flooring throughout a space creates a far-reaching optical illusion like an infinity pool. It is even better when you can keep the flooring consistent all the way into your outdoor living space with wide windowed doors, which creates optimal flow for entertaining. When you break up the flooring, the separation of rooms is highlighted and makes spaces seem much smaller."

Martin Lof