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Interior Designers Say This Is The Wallpaper Trend You’ll See Everywhere In 2021

Spoiler: It's not just for your walls anymore.

Photographed by Christopher Stark / Courtesy of Jennifer Wundrow

The year 2020 saw a lot of change in terms of design. Colors got brighter, shapes got funkier, and maximalism finally started to replace the beige rooms that have reigned supreme for as long as you can remember. In no way is that more clear than in the increased use of wallpaper. Though once feared by those who aren't design professionals, the treatment has become one of the most coveted details in a room in the past several months. And clearly, that's not stopping anytime soon — as interior designers predict, the 2021 wallpaper trends only point to its increased (and more varied) use.

"Wallpaper changes the feel of any space and people are looking for that right now," Jennifer Wundrow of Jennifer Wundrow Interior Design tells TZR in an email. "We are all searching for the 'WOW!' moment in our homes and wallpaper not only gives us that bang for our buck but also a great deal of personality for a space."

As for what that means in terms of trends, well, there are a few things you can expect to see more and more of as the year stretches on. Not only are many prints getting bigger and louder, they'll also be utilized more frequently in unexpected ways. In other words, wallpaper is getting even more fun in 2021 — so if you're as here for it as we are, continue on to find out how.

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Wallpaper Trend: Large-Scale Abstract Prints

Photographed by Life Created / Courtesy of Lauren Lerner of Living With Lolo

This year, the motto for wallpaper seems to be "go big or go home." That's even more obvious considering Lauren Lerner of Living With Lolo tells TZR she's seeing more "more large-scale wallpapers in abstract and brushstroke patterns" as of late.

Don't stress if you're not exactly sure how to use these types of prints, though. Contrast is your friend here, so try juxtaposing the more organic lines against clean, simple silhouettes — the wallpaper will provide a natural feel that pops against the streamlined room.

Wallpaper Trend: Fresh Textures

Photographed by Thomas Kuoh / Courtesy of Jennifer Wundrow

Wundrow says that along with the uptick in offerings in wallpaper patterns in general, she's seeing them printed on an increasing variety of textures, such as grasscloth, silk, and vinyl. Michael Berzsenyi of Josephine Design House echoes this, saying that she thinks the former is particularly fun for texture right now. "I especially love when you find a textured paper (grasscloth, for instance) set into a geo pattern," she says. "It adds so much depth."

Wallpaper Trend: Trompe L'oeil

According to Sarah Stacey, the lead interior designer at Sarah Stacey Design, many people are looking past geometrics toward a looser, happier vibe. "I am definitely seeing trompe l'oeil wallpaper like Voutsa's Nero Dot paper and Gucci's Marble Wallpaper trending," she tells TZR. But how to use them? She recommends papering small rooms like a powder bathroom or a study. "You can deck those spaces out and get a lot of impact for the spend."

Wallpaper Trend: Vintage Florals

Photographed by Erin Williamson / Courtesy of Sarah Stacey Design

Considering cottagecore's booming popularity, it's no surprise that this year's wallpaper trends fit right into that aesthetic. One of the patterns Stacey is seeing is vintage florals, which she says is a great mood-inducing print to incorporate into a space. If you're really itching to embrace your maximalist side, try your hand at print mixing to take your wallpaper's impact up a notch.

Wallpaper Trend: On The Ceiling

It may be called wallpaper, but it's not just for your walls anymore. "People are realizing that the ceiling is the fifth wall of their home and it deserves some special treatment!" says Lerner, explaining that the use of this treatment above the head is another trend many are starting to get behind. "The surprise of a pop of something special on the ceiling adds interest to space in a unique way."